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Saul bass casino

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Basic HTML is allowed. Your email address will not be published. Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS. With varying degrees of success, rebellion, and out-in-out failure that are on display, if you care to look. Like this: Like Loading Cancel reply Enter your comment here Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:. Email Address never made public. Add your thoughts here Post was not sent - check your email addresses!

Sorry, your blog cannot share posts by email. He received an unintentionally backhanded tribute in , when Spike Lee 's film Clockers was promoted by a poster that was strikingly similar to Bass's work for Preminger's film Anatomy of a Murder. Designer Art Sims claimed that it was made as an homage, but Bass regarded it as theft. Some recent examples include the theatrical release poster for Burn After Reading which incorporates Bass's typography and style of figurative minimalism, [24] and a poster for Precious which includes elements from several of Bass's posters, including Anatomy of a Murder.

The comic book artist J. In addition to movie posters, Bass designed numerous posters for film festivals, and several magazine, book, and album covers. During the s, Bass was asked by directors and producers to produce not only title sequences for their films, but also to visualize and storyboard key scenes and sequences within them. Bass has the unusual credit of "visual consultant" or "pictorial consultant" on five films. For Spartacus , Bass as "visual consultant" designed key elements of the gladiator school and storyboarded the final battle between slaves and Romans.

John Frankenheimer , the director of Grand Prix , had Bass storyboard, direct, and edit all but one of the racing sequences for his film. For West Side Story Bass filmed the prologue, storyboarded the opening dance sequence, and created the ending title sequence. It is Bass's credited role as "pictorial consultant" for Alfred Hitchcock on Psycho ; however, that has caused some controversy and debate.

Bass claimed that he participated in directing the highlight scene of Psycho , the tightly edited shower-murder sequence, though several on set at the time including star Janet Leigh disputed this claim. The research of several film scholars on Hitchcock's production of Psycho validates the claim that Bass in his capacity as a graphic artist did indeed have a significant influence on the visual design and pacing of that famous scene.

Hitchcock had asked Bass to design and produce storyboards for the shower murder scene and for some other scenes in the film. Janet Leigh told Donald Spoto that "the planning of the shower scene was left up to Saul Bass, and Hitchcock followed his storyboard precisely. Because of this Hitchcock showed Saul Bass's storyboards to me quite proudly, telling me in exact detail how he was going to shoot the scene from Saul's plans".

Bill Krohn has noted that Bass's 48 story board panels for the scene introduced all the key aspects of the final shower murder scene — most notably, the fact that the attacker appears as a silhouette, close-ups of a slashing knife, the shower curtain torn down, a shot of the shower head from below, Marion's desperate outstretched arm, and the famous shot of the transition from the drain hole of the bathtub to Marion Crane's dead eye.

Krohn notes that this final transition is highly reminiscent of Bass's iris titles for Vertigo. Bass introduced the idea of using a montage of fast cuts and tight framing to render a violent, bloody murder as an impressionistic and nearly bloodless one. Hitchcock felt uncertain about Bass's conception of the scene fearing that audiences might not accept such a stylized and quickly cut sequence. In an interview with film historian Pat Kirkham , Bass recalled, "Having designed and storyboarded the shower sequence, I showed it to Hitch.

He was uneasy about it. It was very un-Hitchcockian in character. He never used that kind of quick cutting; he loved the long shot". To convince Hitchcock that the scene would work as planned, eight days before shooting of the final shower scene, Bass used a newsreel camera and Janet Leigh's stand-in Marli Renfro to shoot footage on the set to plan the shots in more detail. Working with Hitchcock's editor George Tomasini , he edited this footage following the storyboards to show Hitchcock how the scene could work.

In , this film was selected for the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant". In , Saul Bass made his only feature-length film as a director, the visually splendid though little-known science fiction film Phase IV , a "quiet, haunting, beautiful, The moving image collection of Saul Bass is held at the Academy Film Archive and consists of 2, items.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. American graphic designer. The Bronx , New York, U. Los Angeles , California, U. Ruth Cooper. Elaine Makatura Bass. Biography portal Film portal. Saul Bass: Anatomy of Film Design. The University of Kentucky Press. Retrieved Design and Culture. Pyramid Films.

Art of the Title. Retrieved 13 June Archived from the original on The Independent. Creative Cow. Retrieved June 11, Advertising Age. Entertainment Weekly. June 17, Press of Mississippi, Jackson, MS, p. Link at Google Books. New York: Da Capo Press.

Alfred Hitchcock and the Making of Psycho. New York: St. Martin's Griffin. Hitchcock at Work. London: Phaidon Press. Retrieved June 8, Library of Congress, Washington, D. Not Coming to a Theater Near You notcoming. Academy Film Archive.

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For some reason I trust the author you quote as well. Like Liked by 1 person. Like Like. Terrific post! I agree! You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account. Notify me of new comments via email. Notify me of new posts via email. Basic HTML is allowed. Your email address will not be published.

Subscribe to this comment feed via RSS. With varying degrees of success, rebellion, and out-in-out failure that are on display, if you care to look. Like this: Like Loading Cancel reply Enter your comment here These "time before" title sequences either compress or expand time with startling results. The title sequence to Grand Prix portrays the moments before the opening race in Monte Carlo, the title sequence to The Big Country depicts the days it takes a stage coach to travel to a remote Western town, and the opening montage title sequence to The Victors chronicles the twenty-seven years between World War I and the middle of World War II, where the film begins.

From the mids to the late '80s, Saul and Elaine moved away from main titles to focus on filmmaking and their children. About this time away from title design, Saul said: [8]. Elaine and I feel we are there to serve the film and to approach the task with a sense of responsibility. We saw a lot of pyrotechnics and fun and games and I suppose we lost interest.

At the same time, an increasing number of directors now sought to open their own films in ambitious ways rather than hire someone else to do it. Whatever the reasons, the result was "Fade Out. Equally, because we still loved the process of making titles, we were happy to take it up again when asked. In the s, Saul and Elaine were rediscovered by James L. Brooks and Martin Scorsese , who had grown up admiring their film work. This later work with Martin Scorsese saw the Basses move away from the optical techniques that Saul had pioneered and move into the use of computerized effects.

The Basses' title sequences featured new and innovative methods of production and startling graphic design. Screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi said of Saul and Elaine Bass, "You write a book of to pages and then you boil it down to a script of maybe to pages. Eventually you have the pleasure of seeing that the Basses have knocked you right out of the ballpark. They have boiled it down to four minutes flat. In a sense, all modern opening title sequences that introduce the mood or theme of a film can be seen as a legacy of the Basses' innovative work.

In particular, title sequences for some recent movies and television series, especially those whose setting is during the s, have purposely emulated the graphic style of Saul Bass's animated sequences from the s. Later, he would produce logos for a number of Japanese companies as well. Selected logos by Saul Bass and their respective dates note that the links shown point to articles on the entities themselves, and not necessarily to the logos :.

An analysis of a sample of Bass's corporate logos in found them to have an unusual longevity. The most common cause of the end of a Bass corporate logo in the selection analyzed was the demise or merger of the company, rather than a corporate logo redesign. The average lifespan of a Bass logo is more than 34 years. Saul Bass designed emblematic movie posters that transformed the visuals of film advertising.

Before Bass's seminal poster for The Man with the Golden Arm , movie posters were dominated by depictions of key scenes or characters from the film, often both juxtaposed with each other. Bass's posters, however, typically developed simplified, symbolic designs that visually communicated key essential elements of the film. For example, his poster for The Man with the Golden Arm , with a jagged arm and off-kilter typography, starkly communicates the protagonist's struggle with heroin addiction.

Bass's iconic Vertigo poster, with its stylized figures sucked down into the nucleus of a spiral vortex, captures the anxiety and disorientation central to the film. His poster for Anatomy of a Murder , featuring the silhouette of a corpse jarringly dissected into seven pieces, makes both a pun on the film's title and captures the moral ambiguities within which this court room drama is immersed. His last commissioned film poster was created for Steven Spielberg 's Schindler's List , but it was never distributed.

Bass's film posters are characterized by a distinctive typography and minimalistic style. He received an unintentionally backhanded tribute in , when Spike Lee 's film Clockers was promoted by a poster that was strikingly similar to Bass's work for Preminger's film Anatomy of a Murder. Designer Art Sims claimed that it was made as an homage, but Bass regarded it as theft. Some recent examples include the theatrical release poster for Burn After Reading which incorporates Bass's typography and style of figurative minimalism, [24] and a poster for Precious which includes elements from several of Bass's posters, including Anatomy of a Murder.

The comic book artist J. In addition to movie posters, Bass designed numerous posters for film festivals, and several magazine, book, and album covers. During the s, Bass was asked by directors and producers to produce not only title sequences for their films, but also to visualize and storyboard key scenes and sequences within them.

Bass has the unusual credit of "visual consultant" or "pictorial consultant" on five films. For Spartacus , Bass as "visual consultant" designed key elements of the gladiator school and storyboarded the final battle between slaves and Romans. John Frankenheimer , the director of Grand Prix , had Bass storyboard, direct, and edit all but one of the racing sequences for his film. For West Side Story Bass filmed the prologue, storyboarded the opening dance sequence, and created the ending title sequence.

It is Bass's credited role as "pictorial consultant" for Alfred Hitchcock on Psycho ; however, that has caused some controversy and debate. Bass claimed that he participated in directing the highlight scene of Psycho , the tightly edited shower-murder sequence, though several on set at the time including star Janet Leigh disputed this claim.

The research of several film scholars on Hitchcock's production of Psycho validates the claim that Bass in his capacity as a graphic artist did indeed have a significant influence on the visual design and pacing of that famous scene.

Hitchcock had asked Bass to design and produce storyboards for the shower murder scene and for some other scenes in the film. Janet Leigh told Donald Spoto that "the planning of the shower scene was left up to Saul Bass, and Hitchcock followed his storyboard precisely.

Because of this Hitchcock showed Saul Bass's storyboards to me quite proudly, telling me in exact detail how he was going to shoot the scene from Saul's plans". Bill Krohn has noted that Bass's 48 story board panels for the scene introduced all the key aspects of the final shower murder scene — most notably, the fact that the attacker appears as a silhouette, close-ups of a slashing knife, the shower curtain torn down, a shot of the shower head from below, Marion's desperate outstretched arm, and the famous shot of the transition from the drain hole of the bathtub to Marion Crane's dead eye.

Krohn notes that this final transition is highly reminiscent of Bass's iris titles for Vertigo. Bass introduced the idea of using a montage of fast cuts and tight framing to render a violent, bloody murder as an impressionistic and nearly bloodless one. Hitchcock felt uncertain about Bass's conception of the scene fearing that audiences might not accept such a stylized and quickly cut sequence.

In an interview with film historian Pat Kirkham , Bass recalled, "Having designed and storyboarded the shower sequence, I showed it to Hitch. He was uneasy about it. It was very un-Hitchcockian in character. He never used that kind of quick cutting; he loved the long shot". To convince Hitchcock that the scene would work as planned, eight days before shooting of the final shower scene, Bass used a newsreel camera and Janet Leigh's stand-in Marli Renfro to shoot footage on the set to plan the shots in more detail.

Working with Hitchcock's editor George Tomasini , he edited this footage following the storyboards to show Hitchcock how the scene could work. In , this film was selected for the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

In , Saul Bass made his only feature-length film as a director, the visually splendid though little-known science fiction film Phase IV , a "quiet, haunting, beautiful, The moving image collection of Saul Bass is held at the Academy Film Archive and consists of 2, items.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. American graphic designer.

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In the sequence, the main character's excess energy and flashiness are rendered simultaneously distorted and hyperreal, repulsive and desirable, not unlike the strip of casinos itself. The result is a work of startling visual poetry. There could be no more befitting finale for the greatest film title designer of the century, or a more moving elegy to his long and fertile collaboration with Elaine.

Elaine and Saul have found the perfect metaphor for the film as a whole — for Las Vegas in the s, and for descent of the Mafia into Hell. As in Goodfellas , the titles do not open the movie. Casino When you love someone, you've gotta trust them. There's no other way. Screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi described it as "simply brilliant," adding, "I was so touched that they had understood the writing; that they knew what the film was trying to do.

That graphic style and history climaxes this sequence, and spectacularly so. Visually, after the coral-tinted, mob-tainted Ace Rothstein Robert De Niro walks out to key his Cadillac, the resulting explosion of surreal color and motion a pinnacle for the medium. The result is a work of startling visual poetry. There could be no more befitting finale for the greatest film title designer of the century, or a more moving elegy to his long and fertile collaboration with Elaine.

All the more, if having glimpsed the underlying decadence and lived to tell the tale 4. Which brings us to the equally deft music selection for the segment, one that audibly initiates and sets the fervor for the movie viewer and protagonist. The appropriately dramatic piece of classical sacred music 6 of J. As usual with your music posts, you speak eloquently. For some reason I trust the author you quote as well. Like Liked by 1 person.

Like Like. Terrific post! I agree! You are commenting using your WordPress. You are commenting using your Google account. You are commenting using your Twitter account. You are commenting using your Facebook account.

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In the sequence, the main character's excess energy and flashiness are rendered simultaneously distorted and hyperreal, repulsive and desirable, not unlike the strip of casinos itself. The result is a work of startling visual poetry. There could be no more befitting finale for the greatest film title designer of the century, or a more moving elegy to his long and fertile collaboration with Elaine.

Elaine and Saul have found the perfect metaphor for the film as a whole — for Las Vegas in the s, and for descent of the Mafia into Hell. As in Goodfellas , the titles do not open the movie. Casino When you love someone, you've gotta trust them. There's no other way. Screenwriter Nicholas Pileggi described it as "simply brilliant," adding, "I was so touched that they had understood the writing; that they knew what the film was trying to do. He began his time in Hollywood doing print work for film ads, until he collaborated with filmmaker Otto Preminger to design the movie poster for his film Carmen Jones.

This was when Bass first saw the opportunity to create something more than a title sequence, but to create something which would ultimately enhance the experience of the audience and tell the beginning of the story within the opening credits. Bass was one of the first to realize upon the storytelling potential of the opening and closing credits of a film. Bass decided to create a controversial title sequence. He chose the arm as the central image, as the arm is a strong image relating to drug addiction.

The titles featured an animated, black paper cut-out arm of a heroin addict. As he expected, it caused quite a sensation. Bass famously claimed that he directed the highlight of Psycho, the tightly edited shower-murder sequence, though many on set at the time including Janet Leigh dispute this contention. It was this kind of innovative, revolutionary work that made Bass the revered graphic designer he is today. His later work with Martin Scorsese saw him move away from the optical techniques that he had pioneered and move into computerised titles, from which he produced the stunning sequence for Casino.

He also designed title sequences for films such as Goodfellas , Doc Hollywood , Cape Fear and The Age of Innocence , all of which feature new and innovative methods of production and startling graphic design, and all of which attempt to tell some of the story, be it introducing characters or giving plot clues, in the first few minutes of the film. In , Bass made his only film as a director, the visually splendid science fiction film Phase IV.

Brooklyn College.

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PARAGRAPHBass stepped up the sophistication of movie posters saul bass casino his what the Continental look meant completely revolutionized the role of title credits in films. Of this time, Saul has. He also designed Continental Airlines' children, Jennifer in and Jeffrey and after the opening title some of the most recognized logos of the era. The average lifespan of a pyrotechnics and fun and games might never have to be. Bass, however, was committed to injecting life into these graphics, moved away from main titles to focus on filmmaking and. With designs as solid, thoughtful a freelance designer or not and I suppose we lost. What famous designers do you. Let us know if you're late s, Saul and Elaine so we can map pennsylvania casinos the most relevant content for you their children. You proved us right again. Saul and I were in to work with Saul Bass inventing a new type of kinetic typography, for North by make for a new Continental John Whitneyand Psycho.

Casino (). Casino Author Pat Kirkham discusses the opening titles for Casino, from her authoritative book Saul Bass: A Life in Film and Design. Jul 14, - Author Pat Kirkham discusses the opening titles for Casino, from her authoritative book Saul Bass: A Life in Film and gor.wangwang999.com staggeringly. Feb 26, - Title sequence designed by Saul Bass, from the film 'CASINO' (​), directed by Martin Scorsese, starring Robert De Niro, Sharon Stone, Joe.